Special counsel Robert Mueller calls for former Trump national security advisor. Two attorneys general to subpoena Trump Organization. Lowest coal consumption [r/news, Episode #6]


#1

Special counsel Robert Mueller calls for a light sentence for former Trump national security advisor Michael Flynn

Former national security advisor Michael Flynn has given special counsel Robert Mueller “first-hand” details of contacts between President Donald Trump’s transition team and Russian government officials, a bombshell court document filed Tuesday says.

Mueller in a sentencing memo said Flynn’s “substantial assistance” to his probe warrants a light criminal sentence — which could include no jail time for the retired Army lieutenant general.

That assistance, which includes 19 interviews with Mueller’s team and Justice Department attorneys, related to a previously unknown “criminal investigation,” as well as to Mueller’s long-running probe of the Trump campaign’s and transition team’s links or suspicious coordinations

“The defendant provided firsthand information about the content and context of interactions between the transition team and government officials,” the memo says.

Mueller’s memo almost completely blacks out details of what Flynn might have said.

Flynn provided 19 interviews

Involved in multiple investigations, including into different relationships. Details in the memo were redacted as many relate to an ongoing investigation(s)

An offer of a pardon won’t matter if the man won’t see the inside of a jail.

#2

Judge orders discovery in Trump foreign gifts lawsuit to begin by end of the month

A federal judge has finalized the schedule for when state challengers suing President Donald Trump over proceeds from the Trump International Hotel get to seek evidence for their case.

Judge Peter Messitte has ordered that the initial disclosure of evidence occur by the end of the month in a lawsuit brought by the DC and Maryland state attorneys general. They should receive the rest of the evidence they seek, as well as depositions, by June.

They allege in the lawsuit that the President violated a constitutional clause banning gifts and advantages from foreign and domestic governments because of his family company’s stake in the Trump hotel in Washington.

In a court filing before the judge’s ruling Monday, Trump’s lawyer wrote that the President has had to participate in various court activities in the case so far, including “the drafting, editing, and negotiation of a Protective Order and a discovery protocol for Electronically Stored Information,” indicating that the President may have been told what information about the Trump International Hotel he may no longer share publicly or with others outside the case if it moves forward.

His lawyer argued that “the President will need to review the flurry of discovery requests and responses that the other parties will trade; he also will need to review the significant third-party discovery Plaintiffs seek.”

2 attorneys general to subpoena Trump Organization, Treasury

The attorneys general of the District of Columbia and Maryland plan to file subpoenas Tuesday seeking records from the Trump Organization, the Treasury Department and dozens of other entities as part of a lawsuit accusing Donald Trump of profiting off the presidency.

Other Trump entities that officials plan to subpoena include those related to his Washington hotel and its management. Eighteen private entities including restaurants, venues, and hotels that compete with the Trump hotel are also being subpoenaed to “illuminate the unfair nature of that competition,” said Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh.

There is a separate federal lawsuit involving the General Services Administration, which oversees the lease for the hotel with the Trump Organization. Democratic lawmakers want to know how Trump was approved by the GSA to maintain the lease of the Trump International Hotel in Washington after he became president.

The hotel is housed in the historic Old Post Office, which is owned by the federal government, and its lease has a clause barring any “elected official of the government of the United States” from deriving “any benefit.”

#3

US coal consumption drops to lowest level since 1979

Americans are consuming less coal in 2018 than at any time since Jimmy Carter’s presidency, a federal report said Tuesday, as cheap natural gas and other rival sources of energy frustrate the Trump administration’s pledges to revive the U.S. coal industry.

A report by the U.S. Energy Information Administration projected Tuesday that 2018 would see the lowest U.S. coal consumption since 1979, as well as the second-greatest number on record of coal-fired power plants shutting down.