Trump said he canceled his meeting with Putin. Michelle Obama’s “Becoming” is 2018’s bestselling book. Half the land in Oklahoma could be returned to Native Americans [r/politics, Episode #2]

#1

Trump said he canceled his meeting with Putin over Ukraine. They met at the G20 anyway – The U.S. president just can’t quit Vladimir Putin, who wants yet another meeting before the middle of next year.

The White House said last week that President Donald Trump would not meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G20 summit, in a move meant to show U.S. displeasure over Moscow’s aggression toward Ukraine.

Somehow though, the two leaders met, after all, the Kremlin has revealed. News reports said Trump and Putin talked on the sidelines of the gathering of global leaders, which wrapped up late Saturday in Buenos Aires.

And that’s not the last of it. Putin says he’d like to meet Trump again before the middle of next year.

“Of course a new meeting is possible,” Kremlin aide Yuri Ushakov told reporters, according to Reuters. “Now we need to again have talked about preparing such a meeting.”

The White House confirmed that Trump and Putin held what was described as an “informal conversation” at dinner on Friday evening.

The issue of how often Trump and Putin meet — usually outside the earshot of others — has become a more salient issue than ever. The question has increased in importance after revelations last week that Trump had been in negotiations, deep into his presidential campaign, to build a massive tower in Moscow.

Redditors think Putin might have just told Trump to say it was canceled so it would look worse when it happened.

Literally, as soon as Trump said it was off newspapers were saying it would still happen exactly like this.

#2

Michelle Obama’s “Becoming” is 2018’s bestselling book after only 15 days.

It took only two weeks for Michelle Obama’s memoir Becoming to top the 2018 book charts. Its publisher, Penguin Random House, announced on Nov. 30 that the book sold more than 2 million copies across the US and Canada in the 15 days since its launch on Nov. 13. The number includes all formats, including e-book and audiobook.

The book gives unprecedented insight into Obama’s life after a decade in the global spotlight. In it, she talks about her marriage, race, career, family, and variously associated struggles. She also lays into Donald Trump.

Meanwhile, her memoir surpassed in sales the loudest book account of the Trump presidency, Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury, despite the latter’s 11-month head start.

Users of Reddit say that it’s a great book. one of them has Just finished reading it and says that it gave a great perspective in today’s world where it’s really easy to be cynical and lose hope.

#3

Half the land in Oklahoma could be returned to Native Americans. It should be

On the morning of June 22, 1839, the Cherokee leader John Ridge was pulled from his bed, dragged into his front yard and stabbed 84 times while his family watched. He was assassinated for signing the Cherokee Nation’s removal treaty, a document that — in exchange for the tribe’s homelands — promised uninterrupted sovereignty over a third of the land in present-day Oklahoma. That promise was not kept.

The history of tribal land, with small exceptions, has moved unforgivingly in one direction. Today, American Indian reservations comprise only 55 million acres or 2 percent of all land in the United States. Meanwhile, the National Forest Service occupies 200 million acres. In the emergence of this great nation, our government set aside more land for trees than for Indians.

Oklahoma’s position is that no such statement is needed because the sheer and devastating totality of “everything [that] was taken away from tribes,” as the state’s lawyer argued, is indication enough that Congress intended to leave them with nothing, much less a reservation, and “not one single absolute smidgen” of sovereignty over their land.

More than 100 Indian reservations went through allotment, and arguably every tribe has had something — whether land, children, money, books or papers — seized by the United States or their surrounding state. If such hostile actions alone can be evidence to the Supreme Court that a reservation no longer exists, tribes could lose land without their or even Congress’s consent. In short, it would set a unique and dangerous precedent that merely treating Native Nations as though their land does not belong to them is enough to take it away.

If the Supreme Court rules in favor of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the land that John Ridge not only died on but for could be acknowledged as Cherokee land for the first time in more than 100 years. John signed the treaty of New Echota knowing he would be killed for it but believing that the rights of the Cherokee Nation enshrined in that blood-soaked document were worth it.